Wednesday, June 11, 2008

A Two Painting Day!!!


'First Sign Of Corn' - 11x14 - oil © Marc R. Hanson 2008

Wouldn't that have been nice?!?! First one of the day was a "wiper". It wasn't a total loss, but I just wasn't 'in the groove' so I decided that rather than waste the board I'd wipe it and move forward. And wouldn't you know it. Five minutes after I did that a local magazine photographer showed up to shoot images for a new publication that is featuring the area. Just my luck.

Fortunately, my painting partner Kami had hers going well, and still intact, so they shot a lot of her working.

So later in the day I took a short drive out my 'painting' road and found this scene. Just another cloud study, or a reflection of just how nice it felt to just be out there looking at the new crops just coming up on a gorgeous day.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

-was driving in the country the other day wondering how you would paint those baby rows of green coming up out of the ground - and now I know!
Thanks!

Donna T said...

Absolutely gorgeous clouds, Marc! I love how they get pinker near the horizon. Is the painting you posted on Monday, titled "June 7" the same location as your pastel "Arcola Spring"? That area looks very familiar and the trees seem to have recovered their greenness and lost the yellow.

Marc R. Hanson said...

anonymous... That's a tricky thing to decide on. The important decision is "how much" of it to paint and still have it be as critical as it needs to be to the overall scene. For instance, the thought passed through my mind that they (maybe 4" high) might not even be necessary to the painting's theme overall. But when looking at the overall color harmony of the scene, they had to be included in some way just because of the influence that their color had on that harmony. There was a time when I probably would have painted them leaf by leaf, stalk by stalk. It's amazing that I didn't need to be committed! My approach now is to paint 'only as much as is minimally needed' to say 'green vegetation in rows'... I don't feel the urge to say much more about it than that. So that guides the way that I paint them. Long story for a simple idea! ;-)

Marc R. Hanson said...

Donna T... Thank you!!! Yes, it is the same location. I painted there yesterday too, but that one was the one I wiped out. The water is back up to the knees...on the trees now! Those little spits of grass are all underwater all over again. Thanks for looking in.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for that great description!

I like when a painting has life both up close in detail and from the broad, stepped-back view (if it's possible to truly get either on a computer screen.......). I like the sweep of those rows that show the gentle arching of the field, and the amazing way that, in the teeny proportion of the canvas that they ribbon under the big sky, they project a big part of the whole landscape's perspective ---and those horizontal "stripes" of fields beyond them, and the perfect renderings of the different depths of the trees, and the blue hills way back.
(You made dancing clouds that day.) (I noticed you edited your post.)

Michael Pieczonka said...

It's amazing how you say you aren't painting a lot of detail in these paintings, but they read like there is. You have a great eye for simplifying!
I notice you do quite a few workshops, do you ever do any in NY state or near Ontario? (I'm in Toronto).

Frank Gardner said...

Gorgeous! I am really drawn to the difference between the close and distant trees. The sky is another beauty.

Dianne Mize said...

Marc, I have come back to this painting several times so thought if I was going to hang around, I should leave a comment and tell you how splendid a work it is.

Anonymous said...

This sky moves. Exactly the same as lying in the grass watching the clouds float by overhead. This sky moves.

Jennifer McChristian said...

It's one thing to just paint clouds, but to actually capture the sense of 'atmosphere' convincingly and beautifully as you have in this painting is masterful.
Bravo!