Thursday, December 4, 2008

Tonal block in


I thought that I'd show some steps along the way with the painting of the larger version of the little sketch from a few days ago. This is nothing more than a transparent tonal block in using Perm alizarin and transp. oxide brown. I don't always start this way but for this one wanted a warm undertone to play against the color I overlay. So I am letting this dry so that it's not subject to being picked up with subsequent washes or color application.

I'll keep you posted as.....if..... something happens????!!!

17 comments:

Sharon Wright said...

You can see already it is gong to be a magical painting. Haven't used those colours myself fo blocking in, but now I just might.

VanDerHoekArt said...

Thanks for the very thoughtful reply to my comment on your last post Marc.

Interesting that you said painting has always been part of your identity. That's what it's become for me as well. It's easy to loose yourself in the ebb and flow of family life. This might sound strange but painting reminds me of who I am other than a mother and wife.

An ususual combination of colors for a start. Must keep this in mind for a future landscape. Can't wait to see more!

patricia walsh said...

It is so nice to see an artist put their beginnings up - I always feel like I am cheating somehow when I do this even though I know that this is ridiculous. The daily blog is a great idea and I find that it keeps me from getting stuck but.........it can also lead to a sort of pressure that ties right into all of the fears we do have as artists. I find that an acceptance of the process rather than the final result keeps me on track for the most part. I am new to this blogging thing and have already discovered that I am simply not willing to post my efforts on some days just for the sake of having something presentable to photograph. I love your work and just discovered you this morning when I got up way too early. Take care and try not to freeze up there.

Alicia PadrĂ³n said...

I love it already!! :o)

Frank Gardner said...

Looking good Marc.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Sharon the first part is always the 'good part'. :) The hard part is keeping it that way. Nothing more beautiful than a pure white yard/meter of taught, stretched white linen or canvas.

From there, it's always a battle, but a good one.

Thank you.....

Marc R. Hanson said...

Hey Kim. You're welcome. What you say doesn't sound strange to me at all. But then most of the people in my world are artists, male and female. Your gender has it so much more difficult than mine in terms of being able to be "understood" as what you are, what ever that is.

You are SO lucky to have painting in your life! We are all very fortunate to be able to say that. :) Hang on tight, don't let go!!!

Thanks.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Patricia... but it's already frozen and so am I!

I understand what you're saying, believe me. If you search my blog back into last year, you'll see a painting that never made it past the first few posts in the progression. I think the stretcher bars from that one are on some other piece that was successful. But that one was not!!! Oh well. The truth is that if you are pushing your own comfort zone, and everyone...EVERYONE... should be, you are going to have failures. I don't know an experienced (honest) painter who doesn't have them.

So starting it up in public doesn't leave much wiggle room for excuses, that's for sure.

I've learned not to be worried about that. In art school there was an instructor who had us put up our 'finished projects' on a 'crit rail' for critiques. If he really, really didn't like your effort, or if your effort was obviously given very little thought in it's completion as an assignment, it ended up on the floor in front of the crit rail for the rest of the class day and critique. By the end of the day it was full of his footprints, and you were full of a rather hardened shell against being too sensitive over your work.

This was designed to number one, make you think and work harder, and number two, to toughen you up for the day when you'd have to deal with clients and art directors who would treat you like a machine or product.

My point, if there is one, is that there isn't any secret magic that goes on in this painting thing. You know that, but a lot of beginning painters and the general public sometimes think that there is.

It's really a lot of hard work, experimentation (which implies some failure), and building on the failures and successes.

I teach too. That always involves putting yourself on the spot and leaving yourself open to a disaster!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Alicia!!!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Frank...we'll see????????

Alexander Jay said...

Always exciting to see a painting 'as it happens', so to speak.......

Solvay said...

AS
not if.

: )

Fun seeing Alicia over here!
Hi, Alicia!!!
: )

Again: AS.
!!!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Alexander... it's really happening...can't you see it??? ;-)

Marc R. Hanson said...

Solveg....Yes Ma'am! ;-)

Solvay said...

LOL

Theresa Rankin said...

Beautifully understated! I can't wait to see the finished product!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Theresa despite a bug all this past week, I'm almost there. I'll post it when it's done. Thanks.