Friday, August 21, 2009

Demos from August Taylors Falls workshop.

This is a brief post just to keep something going here. I finished up another workshop with a wonderful group of students on the 14th of August. I'm about to head to New York for another five day workshop tomorrow and will take the time (when I have it) to talk more about both of these events. For now, here are some of the demos that I did for the class last week. We had a nocturne night and I made the mistake of painting under a very orange light. The result is much more red than I thought it was going to be, lesson learned.


'Don's House' - 6x8 oil.
I use value studies as part of the curriculum in my workshops as a means to show and let be seen by the students, just how important it is to create a good value pattern and scheme in their paintings so that they're better able to understand and use color more effectively.


'Across the Pond' - 11x14 oil © Marc R. Hanson '09
I did this demo to talk about reflections and how the color and values in the reflections change in both areas.


'Taylors Falls Nocturne' - oil 10x8 © Marc R. Hanson '09
Well... the lighting situation messed with me. I did capture one of my students, Steve, painting with an LED booklight. Man was that thing blue!


'Mary's Wall' - 11x14 pastel © Marc R. Hanson '09
I usually have at least a couple of pastelists in the group and try to give them some of the limited demo time in that medium. There's a lot to cover in five days and it really doesn't matter what medium you're using, the principles are the same. I'm not teaching 'Oil Painting' or 'Pastel Painting' workshops in this case, those are for another time.


'Clay Pot Bell' - 11x14 oil © Marc R. Hanson '09
This was the last demo, literally, it ended at 3:00 pm on Friday. We had been beat to death with heat and wind the last couple of days so it was as hard for the students to endure this as it was for me to do it. I painted this pretty fast, choosing the place to paint entirely because we were all in the shade. I painted this about as fast as I've painted an 11x4 before. There would be more to do normally, but that's all I had left.

19 comments:

Eugene said...

A lot of the time I cant tell whether you have used Pastel or Oil for your paintings. Your ability in both are a joy to behold.

Jack said...

Black and white paintings are more colorful..lol...thanks for such a nice post..

--
Jack
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Tim said...

Hahah, awesome! I got two of those LED book light clip ons from Barnes and Noble when i used to got watercolor sketching at the Natural History Museum in NYC. Not only was one light a blue and the other a greenish tone, but man did those things attract the kids! But I have been toying with the idea of soldering myself a setup with cool LED (6000k´s) and hook them up to some batteries so i can go nocturnal like you guys did.

solarcellphonecharger said...

great painted

painthorsestudio said...

Excellent plein air work. Great inspiration to get a babysitter and get back outdoors- thanks!

Jo Castillo said...

Marc, I so appreciate your work and your discussions. Sorry I don't comment more. I do look in often. Thanks for posting.

Kim VanDerHoek said...

It sounds like you covered a lot of material in the workshop, I'm sure your students learned a great deal.

Value studies are something I need to do more of myself.

Caio Fernandes said...

it is always good to come back to see your production .
it is all very good .

Vicki Sergent said...

Love the reflections and the nocturne. Am very fond of warm paintings, so the color of the nocturne is quite pleasing to me.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Eugene. I came to pastel as an oil painter after reading one article in an early Artist Magazine by an artist named Frank Zuccharelli (sp?). The article described how he made his primer for preparing boards for use with pastel. I have Harvey Dinnerstein's and the first Albert Handell books in which they describe a similar method. This is all prior to papers manufactured with a sanded surface, back into the early 80's late 70's.
But Frank's description and photos of his paintings in the article looked like OIL paintings!!!
I immediately thought that I wanted to try the pastels out at that point, did and have always used them in a similar way as I do oil paints. I wash in the early stages like i do with oils, and then apply the pastel in strokes that replicate a brush stroke. It's the most comfortable way, the only way really, for me to use them.
I don't use that surface anymore, the manufactured papers are so much more consistent, but I've never forgotten why I first thought pastels might be interesting to use.

Marc R. Hanson said...

I agree Jack. They can be just as captivating. Take a look at Frederic Remington, Harold Von Schmidt, Haddon Sunblom for a few of the painters who were masters of black and white.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Tim Mighty Bright has done it for you. Also Natural Light by Ott, I think. Both now have LED's that are pretty well balanced. I just found this out because the little 1" fluorescent fixture is no longer available but students had purchased little clamp on LED's that were just as good as the one I use.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Solar...

Marc R. Hanson said...

Krisitina thank you. Get that baby sitter!!! ;-)

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Jo... sorry that I don't reply often enough!!! ;-)

Marc R. Hanson said...

Kim we all need to do more of those B&W's. Thank you.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Caio! Appreciate that.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Vicki, thanks.

Steve said...

That Steve guy sure is handsome, Never looked better You captured him in his best light. Nocturnally Loose!

Thanks for an awesome week. Amazing to watch your work. I might hit 20 paintings by the end of the week.