Tuesday, September 29, 2009

New Paintings

I see it's been awhile since I posted. I taught a two day workshop a week and a half ago in Zumbrota, MN to a group of eager students. We had good weather, good subjects but frankly, not enough time. Before that and following the week, I have been working on a 24x36 painting on location. I finally had to finish it in the studio yesterday because the season has progressed and what I was painting is now a thing of the past. I think that I spent 5 days, about 3 to 4 hrs or more at a shot on location, and one day in the studio, about 5 hours. So I guess this was painted about 80% on location with just the finishing touches done yesterday.

This is the largest on location painting that I've done. At first I thought it would be a one shot painting...duh...not so. And in fact what I really value about working this way, I have discovered, is that returning for multiple visits gives me time inbetween to consider what I've done, critique the progress and adjust along the way. I have completely found that to be an advantage and the process has drawn me in and taken hold. My only regret is that winter is close, not because I don't look forward to painting large winter paintings on location, but because it is nice to be comfortable while dealing with what is a pretty difficult thing to do anyway.

The Beauport and large palette are GREAT! I love that easel.



'Autumn Fields'- oil, 24x36 © Marc R. Hanson '09

I've included a couple of photos of my start. I meant to film the progress but I was consumed by it and completely forgot to follow through on that.





This next painting is the result of some hazy weather that kept me from working on the larger painting one morning. As I was heading to the location I saw this scene and desperately wanted to paint it. But it was in an area where there was no way I could safely get off of the road for more than a couple of minutes. There was no room to stand out of the way of traffic. The other thing was that the condition that was so attractive was about to dissolve as well. So the only thing left is to resort to the camera and memory. That's what I did.


'North End'- oil, 16x20 © Marc R. Hanson '09
This was painted with a limited palette of Cad Yellow Lemon, Prussian Blue and Alizarin Crimson. A perfect palette for this particular color scheme and mood.

31 comments:

Jo Castillo said...

These are both wonderful and great subjects. I love the feel of the second one, probably because I love barns ... and cows.

Shelley Ross said...

Hi Marc
Thanks for posting the pictures of your plein air setup. It gives me so much information that I am seeking! And reading about the benefits of returning to the same sight is great. I really appreciate that you share your solutions.

Shelley Vancouver, BC

Janelle Goodwin said...

As usual, your paintings show great sensitivity. Always a pleasure to see what you come up with next, Marc!

Christopher O'Handley said...

Both are wonderful paintings. The second one has a Trevor Chamberlain type feeling to it, very atmospheric.

I love seeing the "in progress" shots, as it's always interesting to see how different artists approach the painting process. Regarding coming back to a spot after reviewing the painting at home - I think that's a great way to go, and have been doing that myself lately, even for smaller paintings. I still often find that my paintings look too dark or colorless when I bring them indoors, so more and more I'll then go back and re-work them the next day. I'm not so much the "plein air purist" that I used to be, though I still like being able to complete them in one sitting when possible...

Donna T said...

I love to check this blog and see new paintings - these are wonderful, Marc. I appreciate the progress shots as well as the photo of the scene. It's always so helpful to see how you edit reality. Our 'peas' are a dull tan color now. I love the green and gold sparkle stage and wished it lasted longer.

Dan Michael said...

Yeah, you're back online! It's always great to see what you're working on. Autumn Fields is definately my new favorite, wonderful atmosphere and light.

Dale Sherman Blodget said...

Wow, really nice to see how you made a lovely scene better! The color shift to a more violet blue against warmer yellow is gorgeous.

Eugene said...

Marc you are a master of taking the mundane and forgettable and making it into something moving and memorable.

I would have passed the "Autumn Fields" location without a second look.

Thanks for doing what you do.

RUDHI - BY CHANCE said...

Enjoy your paintings and skills, Marc! Greetings from Austria.

Karen Hargett said...

I've been having withdrawal ;-) These are beautiful paintings - love them both but really like the second one. I'm with Jo - love barns and cows.

Mark D. Johnson said...

How ambitious to tackle a 24x36 on location! Nicely done. Love the 'North End' piece - great composition and atmosphere!

Frank Gardner said...

These are both really nice Marc. Had to come and take yet another look.
Can't wait to see some of your work in person.

Hmmm, that beats the 24x30 I was gonna do. Maybe I need to get a 30x40.

Erik said...

Hi Marc, love the light in that North end painting.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Jo. I liked those barns too, then the cows showed up.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Shelley... You're welcome. I was out yesterday in a real bruising wind and rain situation and that easel barely moved. It gives you a real sense of confidence while working to know that you can concentrate on painting and staying comfortable without having to worry about your setup tumbling over.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Janelle. I'm a 'Subtleist' I've decided. Can't get away from it no matter how hard I try.
Could be a new name for a movement?!

Marc R. Hanson said...

I hear you Chris. It's (plein air) a means to an end, not the end itself in my case and in yours it sounds like too. A painting is a project, not a race to the finish.

Good to hear you're out there painting!!!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Donna... Do you call them 'peas' too? I heard them called that somewhere in my travels and can't remeber what region of the country it was in. Around here they're 'beans', but somewhere I've been they are called 'peas'. Black-eyed peas are also 'not' peas but beans so I wonder if it's in the south?

Thanks for the comments. I appreciate it.

I am going to try to take more progress shots in the future. A lot of the time it's hard to remember to do that, set the tripod up each time, when in the heat of the battle.

Tim said...

Ahh, its nice to come back from the Sorolla show in Madrid and catch up with my old fave blogs! And to see that your biggin´it up! what substrate is that, a panel?

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Dale. The land mass was so warm, including the shadows, that if I added a touch of anything that was too cool it jumped right back at me screaming "warm me up!". There was so much warmth in all of the vegetation that I think that it was bouncing back up into every single shadow and warming them beyond what we would normally see.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Hey Eugene... thanks for the thoughts and for showing up again.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Ruhdi... Thank you and greetings to Australia from Minnesota. Happy spring/summer to you.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Karen. Not so many blog posts when stacking up in process larger paintings.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Hi Dan... Thanks.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Mark. Weather is going to put a wrinkle in this idea. Once the rains stop and the snow shows up it will be better. You can stay warm, but the 'wet' ruins things like stretched linen.

Marc R. Hanson said...

He-he... Thanks Frank. I've seen what you're doing to those 18x24's. You'll be out there with a 36x48 before long. Maybe we're going to be part of the revival of what is going on in landscape painting. Getting back to the roots like Metcalf, Chase, Redfield and others did in the landscape... paint large. Hope so.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you Erik! What a beautiful morning that was. I already miss the season that was.

Frank Gardner said...

More than likely Marc. I ordered up another one of those Gloucester easels 'cause I like it so much.
Just ordered it and am really hoping that it gets here in the next two weeks. It takes a while for my boxes to arrive sometimes. They bring it all in by donkey still you know. : )

Marc R. Hanson said...

TIM....SOROLLA!!! I'm crying and jealous. You are one lucky dude to have gone to see that show. Dang. My hero!

The 24x36 is stretched Claessen's linen, AC166. It's an acrylic primed version of the oil primed C66. Has a good texture for slightly larger sizes and takes the paint beautifully.

Thanks for the comments. I'm still jealous. ;-)

Marc R. Hanson said...

(Laughing)... Me too. Just in case they disappear from the market as most good things do eventually. Can't beat the price anyway.

So a donkey transport business might be a good way to be able to survive and afford to live in your beautiful location???

Eugene said...

lol Marc you'd have to chase me away from here with rabid dogs...and I'm not sure that would even work. :-)


Hopefully soon I can break free from my blocked doldrums and start painting again after being in a black hole for years.