Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Time to return to the sanity of the Blog World.

"Ditches And Dust"  - Oil on canvas - 12"x24"


It's been quite a while since I devoted any real quality time to keeping this blog up to date, relevant or anything but fodder for cricket noise.  I have decided to calm down the crickets, get relevant and update things Art related, with a touch of life thrown in, and resurrect this dinosaur.

What brings me to this place?  Well, I am thankful for Social Media, Facebook in particular, for what it has brought to the table in terms of Connections with old and new friends, and the  Inspiration that has been to me.  Facebook has been very satisfying, serving as a surrogate crowd to help turn down the quiet of the studio here in Mississippi, and elsewhere.  It has supplanted the 'alone' aspect of our work as artists with many hours of camaraderie.  But for me, it has become like a Roman Colosseum where too many peasants are thrown to the lions, too often.  It's too loud.

I'm going to attempt to funnel viewers and followers of my art, back to this platform, where there aren't obnoxious ads, the constant rush of extraneous, petty subject matter, and all the traffic that jams up and diverts the true meaning of anything that you might want to say about art, painting, or life, on Facebook.

Before the advent of Facebook, this blog stuff was calming, comfortable, and for the most part, a friendly place to share, chat, inform, learn and make connections with collectors and artists.  Many of you have become dear friends, we've shared experiences, art, and life in some cases.  I'm sorry that I have left it behind like I have.  I enjoy other's blogs, and have been noticing a little bit of a return to them with some of the artists who I like to follow.

I know this is old fashioned, Instagram is where most people head now for the instant satisfaction of either sharing or viewing what else is "instantly" (name sake, duh) being shown and shared.  Frankly, Instagram doesn't satisfy my need for the visual experience of seeing art large.  I know I can access it on the laptop, but you can't post to it from there.  Maybe it's the older eyes?  But I can't stare at paintings on a platform that fits into my front jeans pocket, without feeling like I'm not getting the whole enchilada.

The fact that the blog platform isn't "instant", is Exactly why I for one am returning to it.  If there is anyone out there who is not a cricket, stay tuned...

I have been thinking about this since this morning.  I only speak for myself, I'm not trying to suggest that any of this isn't good for someone else.  The other reason that I am really interested in getting back here to the blog is that I think it will slow down my own tendency to post Anything and Everything before I even wash out the brushes or clean off the palette!  I used to really enjoy the chance to show process immediately.  But it is wiser, I think, to allow some germination of an idea before just "blasting it out there"!  No more just snapping a shot and plastering it all over without regard for the quality of the image.  I don't think it's good for how my art is presented to do it that way, and it's not good for the viewers who don't really see the truest representation of my images.


44 comments:

Richard Moran said...

I look forward reading your blog and seeing your works here!! Great idea!!

Christopher O'Handley said...

Welcome back, Marc!

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thanks Richard and Chris! Glad there are two live ones out there!

Paul Nutting said...

I also look forward to your insights, musings, and such. I would be interested to hear some of the important differences for you in painting CO and MS.

John Fleck said...

Welcome back! Your art and blog posts have provided LOTS of inspiration for me.

Cheers - John

Marc R. Hanson said...

Paul... That's a great idea! It's going to take me some time to be here long enough to get out into this place and really paint it though. I will have time beginning in early November. Travel should be wrapped up until Spring then. Thanks for the input, I like it.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Thank you John Fleck!

Claire Beadon Carnell said...

I started posting again to my bog a few weeks ago, and look forward to seeing your painting posts on your blog, Marc. As much as I like Facebook, Blogger seems so much more civilized!

John Fleck said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
cj roughton said...

I so agree and have been waiting on you !!! I like blogs too!

John Fleck said...

Sorry about the multiple posts!

But while I'm here (again), I came across your name in an article on painting nocturnes:
http://www.artistsnetwork.com/articles/art-demos-techniques/plein-air-nocturnes

In it you reference using a particular light:
"(the Naturalamp Full Spectrum Daylight Book Light from Mighty Bright, www.mightybright.com)"

I can't seem to find that light. Was there an error in the article?
I am looking to try nocturnes myself, and am in need of a fairly neutral clamp/clip on light.
Thanks

Peter Yesis said...

You may have inspired me to do the same... feels like I'd be taking the dust cover off an old favorite car that's been hid away in a garage. Facebook connected us with so many instant friends. Perhaps it's time to look beyond the instant. Looking forward to some actual reading and some great thoughtful commentary in your blog.

Norman Nybo said...

Right on, Marc ..... totally agree...started doing the same thing for the same reasons about 2 months ago.

Paul R. Fayard said...

"We can rebuild him. We have the technology. Make him better, stronger, slower." Great way to resurrect the dinosaur! Thanks! Looking forward to the next footprint. Glad it will be in Mississippi mud.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Claire, cj, Norman (Terry?), Peter... Good to hear like minds about this. I agree with Peter, and think that's what is driving this for me... "time to look beyond the instant.". Well said.

John Fleck... That was good info. They quit making that particular light. It was a little mini fluorescent, might be why. I still use their LED Dual Head light. The color is really accurate. If you wanted to spend the $$$ (they are 3 figures), there is another light on the market that a lot of painters are using. The Revelite... https://revelite.com/products.php?product=Easel-Light

René PleinAir said...

Why not go back to wetcanvas, those where the days B-) the sooner Facebook passed the better I'll guess. Looking forward to this revival Marc. Good luck!

Joan Sicignano said...

Hi Marc,
I feel the same way. I have given Facebook all my attention and it is a way to see some great artwork. But lately I also miss the blogging of old. We were a family of kindred spirits with the same passion for art. Happy you are back, love your work, your words of wisdom on art and life in many ways. So , looking forward to seeing and reading your post.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Welcome Paul Fayard! I am loading the van right now for one last fall trip west for art biz. I'll be honest, it is so dang nice out here in Mississippi right now, that I feel like playing hooky and doing just what you suggest, laying low in a swamp with a paintbox! It has been great meeting you here in my new home.

René... That is going WAAAYYYY back! I don't remember my password, do you? ;) You've still been blogging all along right?

Agreed, Joan Sicignano! I hate to complain about FB, it's a great platform for that instant fix or contact. Like Peter Yesis alluded to, it's not what Facebook has, it what it doesn't have that is a good reason for blogging. I am also looking forward to a different pace here, but still with the objective of community and sharing of thought and information. I have to figure out how to follow other blogs... I never understood how that worked?

Compton Studio said...

Yay Marc Hanson! I always looked forward to reading your blog posts! So glad you are coming back. Love the painting you posted as well.

Cate kauffman said...

I like my blog as a way to process my thoughts and I enjoy reading the blogs of others as they do the same thing. I do have my blog connected to my Facebook account. But for the life of me, I haven't figured out Instagram yet.

Gayle said...

Abolutely agree! As a grateful artist blog reader, I love hearing the story behind the paintings. Leads to a deeper appreciation for the artist and the art. Thank you!

newyorkcitypainter said...

Hi Marc, Yours was one of the first art blogs I started reading back in the day before I had my own. So glad you will be writing again. If you are looking for posting ideas, I'd love to see a post about your new MS studio.

As for following other blogs, sign into Blogger, then get onto the layout. There is an option to add a blog list. Then it is just a matter of clicking add and then copy and paste your favorite blogs. I just added you to my list.

Looking forward to your posts.

Frances

Lili Anne Laurin said...

You have a wonderful writing style and have brought up important points I have been thinking about lately, namely posting poorly photographed work or work that shouldn't be out there in the first place. Look forward to your next post.

janene said...

So glad to see your blog post. Im a face book drop out. For the very reasons you mentioned. The noise and clutter turned me away. I am looking forward to seeing more of your posts and your art. I do a watercolor sketch every morning while eating my breakfast and then post to my blog. Its a routine I am comfortable with. No masterpieces just the exercise. So far have not dunked dirty brush in cereal bowl.

Haidee-Jo Summers said...

Bravo Marc! Welcome back to my inbox!
I am also trying to fight against the instant gratification of posting every new work... but it's so hard! There are all those lovely people who follow me on Instagram to think about ;-)

lee ackerman said...

I just signed up to get your blog in email. I've been following your posts on Facebook and enjoy your comments and paintings. I look forward to reading more of your philosophy and learning some of your tips. One day I hope to be able to attend a workshop with you. I'm so impressed that you work equally well in so many mediums. Till then best wishes.

Jim Bortz said...

Thumbs up my friend! Looking forward to having you back.

Deb P said...

Love, love this painting. And that you will be blogging more. Most social media is like trying to shout at each other over the din of a crowded sports bar. THE blog is more like sitting down for a cup of coffee with a friend. Bravo for the decision.

Michael Chesley Johnson said...

My thoughts exactly, Marc. Facebook and all the other social media venues are built for superficial, "skating the surface" postings. Deep thinking doesn't happen there. So, like the other commentors, I'm looking forward to more essays from you here in your blog.

Trina Stephenson said...

Heartfelt and true. I don't enjoy instagram, twitter, and facebook much. It just is a place to brag, flame and post. Not much thoughtful dialog on those platforms. It reminds me of the idea that exposure is good for your art. Is it?...

Army Air Force Composite Group said...

Hi Marc,
Let's face it, Facebook is (for the most part) a total time waster. I keep my time on it to a minimum. I think my mother called it "wool gathering". Keep up with the blog.

Don

Rubysboy said...

Welcome back! I've missed your blog posts, especially seeing your paintings.

Kirk Witmer said...

Glad you're back Marc, and well said. You've pretty much echoed my thoughts about both sides of the coin, FB and blogging. I'm just glad to be able to return to painting soon so I can blog again. And when I do I'll be limiting my FB posts to teasers about what's new on my blog!
HA! More than one way to "skin an internet".

psharpe said...

I'm glad to read that you're planning to blog more. I've enjoyed reading and seeing your work through your blog in the past ... but I was wondering why I didn't receive a notice about this. I believe I happen to see that you had a blog post on FB. I had subscripted. Maybe through FineArt Online. Anyway, hope I happen to see your post in my inbox in the future.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Hey, Thanks for all the "returning" support! It looks like the desert is not so deserted after all. Through a friend on FB, and Paul Nutting's post here (see, it's not all bad ;) ), I have come up with an idea. I'm going to start a conversation with other painters in the SE, where we will talk about what it's like to paint in the South. I am a long way from being knowledgable about that, yet. I imagine we are talking Years here. But, I didn't only move here because I like to fish and hunt, and listen to the Blues, or eat catfish. The place speaks to me and my painting sensibilities, the spirit, the soul, the smells, the moods, possibly more than anywhere ever has.

And I've lived in a boat load of different places. 8 grades schools and 3 high schools, spent in short jaunts of 1-3 years, in places ranging from Oxnard, CA (where I was born) to Fairbanks,AK, to the suburbs of Oslo, Norway with places like Texarkana, AR, Mexico Beach, FL and Gregory, SD tossed into the mix, means that I've had to learn the "sense of place" of many places in a relatively brief period of time. After school I found myself mucking around in the mud of the Mississippi River in SE Minnesota, hunting ducks, fishing for walleyes. I can still smell the wet moss of the Norwegian forests that I hiked in, the smell of a pheasant in hand on a South Dakota prairie, and the dead fish I hid under the front steps of our house on Mexico Beach in Florida, or that clean but warm scent of the dry star thistle and Blue Oaks of the northern California hills.

My point is that different parts of our country, of the world, have unique sensory features that I believe attract us to a stronger or lesser degree. In the South, my senses are on high alert! I am still doing a lot of traveling, but I am dying to get lost in the Delta, to find openings in the woodlands of the area that I live in north Mississippi, and paint what those sensibilities mean to me.

So many artists in the South feel that same thing, as do painters all over. Since I'm here now, I would love to talk more about my own reaction to it all, and to have other's share what they feel about it that drives their own work.

That's what is upcoming. In the mean time, I have a couple of 'judge of awards' assignments to tackle. On my way to the En Plein Air Texas event in San Angelo, TX to do that this weekend, from there to Marshall Gallery in Scottsdale next weekend, to be the awards judge for the OPA Western Regional Exhibition.

Once I get home in a week and a half, this blog thing is going to kick into high gear.

Steve Baker said...

Thank you.

Blue Angel said...

How very interesting, to be so in tune with the noises of the world and still prefer the stillness of that first view that becomes ones art. I don't do instagram because to me it's like air popcorn.. no real connection to popping corn at the campsite with friends and family, mosquitoes and cold, but then.. that buttery salty goodness to gobble..
well that and my attention span needs imput, why this what it is. What's it called and how did it become.. nothing like that on sterile instagram.
FB is a myriad of steps like a pyramid. Some work climbing assuredly. Others.. well all they are are labor intensive crazyness. I stay out of that locker room of political arias. But
art.. I've met the most splendid artists there. Seen works that just fill my world with.. well.. everything important to me, I suppose, beauty, emotional and full of depth. For that, I am thankful for fb.
As to blogs.. I would read them eagerly, as if they were chapters installments of a intriguing book.. only to arrive one day, at the doorstop of the blog.. and no one's home -- no further installments.. not even.. why. I would search. I would grieve. Gone was the light dancing on the waves, so to speak. So I shied away from that abrubtness of this is a surreal land. And will occasionally visit . I still enjoy the sea.
Thank you for coming back, for writing so eloquently your hello again, and wishing you every good moment in your art!

sheri farabaugh said...

Now that you mention it, I do watch to many videos of cats falling of a counter. :-) I've had some angry...to the point of scary, posts on FB this past year and have unfriended and blocked a number of people. I'll have to make sure you are one of my Instagram buddies as I look at your work for inspiration. Wish I could have seen the demo in AZ...turning another ordinary scene into something beautiful.

Marc R. Hanson said...

Blue Angel... that's a great point! As a major culprit in your dislike category, I am going to try to think of the blogs as just that sort of a thing. Hope I'm worthy! ;)

Marc R. Hanson said...

Sheri... Nice to see you and meet your husband in Scottsdale! I hope you had safe travels back to CO. I'm home again too, feels good. I found you on Instagram and am now a 'follower'. Yes, FB has been brutal lately. So good to be gone.

Melissa Gayle West said...

Glad to see your blog returning! Longing for quiet and sanity and real connection post-election----perhaps that's a (very) sideways gift of all this insanity.

Anonymous said...

I'll be honest-- I love blogs best and I miss the fact that most people have abandoned theirs. Instagram is like a tease, and as you say it doesn't give you the whole enchilada. The images are small, you can't zoom in as you can on a computer or laptop and fully appreciate the art. . . or, get much of a feel about the artist's personality. I'm just starting to use it too, but I am planning to start a website and blog, too. But mostly, I'm going to focus on making the best work that I can and just sharing my love of art with people. I hope you keep up with your blog. My eyes don't like small images, either, and I like to hear the stories behind the art, too.
Lisa

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